Tuesday, November 29, 2016

NINE THINGS YOU MAY NOT KNOW ABOUT THE WARREN COMMISSION

WARREN COMMISSION SET UP 53 YEARS AGO

Washington, D.C. (JFK+50) The President's Commission on the Assassination of President John F. Kennedy was established fifty-three years ago today, November 29, 1963, one week after the death of the 35th President of the United States.

The final report included 888 pages.  It was presented to President Lyndon B. Johnson on September 24, 1964 and made public three days later.  The Warren Report included 26 volumes of supplementary documents.

94 witnesses testified before the Commission and  all were given the opportunity to be interviewed in open session but only one chose to do so.
395 witnesses were questioned under oath by legal staff of the Commission while 61 gave affidavits and 2 gave statements.

The Warren Commission concluded that the shots which killed President Kennedy and wounded Governor Connally were fired by Lee Harvey Oswald and added...

"On the basis of the evidence before the Commission, it is concluded  that Oswald acted alone."

According to Evan Andrews of www.history.com, there are 9 things that we may NOT know about the Warren Commission.  They include....

1. Some members of the WC were reluctant to serve on it.
2. Gerald Ford secretly fed information to the FBI.
3. Earl Warren suppressed key evidence such as the autopsy photos.
4. The Commission secretly interviewed Fidel Castro.
5. The FBI & CIA misled the Commission.
6. The Commission offered no explanation of Oswald's motives.
7. Both LBJ & the Kennedy family privately disagreed with the Report.
8. Public trust plummeted after the Report was issued.
9. A 2nd government investigation later refuted the lone-gunman theory.

SOURCE

"9 Things You May Not Knox About the Warren Commission," by Evan Andrews, November 18, 2013, www.history.com/


Presentation of the Warren Report 
White House Cabinet Room 
September 24, 1964
Photo by Cecil W. Stoughton
LBJ Library Image